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The Diagnosis of Mental Disorders Using the DSM-IV

  • Gary K. Zammit
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The term “diagnosis” refers to the name by which an illness is identified. The diagnostic terms that are used to identify mental disorders, like those of other medical disorders, are used to classify groups of symptoms that tend to cluster together to form syndromes.1 Each diagnosis is thought to characterize a syndrome that is distinct from others in some meaningful way, probably by virtue of its clinical phenomenology, etiology, course of illness, or response to treatment. Diagnoses have become a fundamental concept in clinical practice because they help to classify patients’ symptoms in common terms, and because they provide clinicians with a context in which to evaluate, understand, and treat their patients.

Keywords

Mental Disorder American Psychiatric Association Personality Disorder General Medical Condition Physical Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary K. Zammit
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Sleep Disorders Institute and Department of PsychiatrySt. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Columbia College of Physicians and SurgeonsUSA

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