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Unintentional Injury

  • Ilana Lescohier
  • Susan Scavo Gallagher
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Viewing adolescent behavior as reckless, in need of restraint and modification, is not new. Whereas earlier generations of thinkers and educators were concerned with building character, a growing segment of their counterparts today are couching the discussion in terms of health. Expressions such as youthful recklessness, problem behaviors, excessive or deviant risk-taking, health-compromising behaviors, and behavioral misadventures are being used not only to describe adolescent behavior, but also to explain adverse health outcomes in this population. A review of the current literature on adolescent behavior and health reveals a repeated theme of attributing ill health in this age group primarily to risk-taking behavior. Injuries, as the major contributor to adolescent death and disability, are being used as a principal example of such a link.

Keywords

Emergency Medical Service Injury Prevention Sport Injury Unintentional Injury Motor Vehicle Crash 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ilana Lescohier
    • 1
  • Susan Scavo Gallagher
    • 2
  1. 1.Injury Control CenterHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.Children’s Safety NetworkEducation Development Center, Inc.NewtonUSA

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