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Tobacco Use

  • Cheryl L. Perry
  • Michael J. Staufacker
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to review (1) the health consequences of adolescent tobacco use, (2) the epidemiology of tobacco use, (3) prevention strategies that have been successfully evaluated, and (4) tobacco cessation strategies applicable to adolescents. This chapter takes advantage of knowledge synthesized in the recent Surgeon General’s report, Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People (USDHHS, 1994).

Keywords

Young People Cigarette Smoking Smoking Prevention Smokeless Tobacco Smoking Initiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheryl L. Perry
    • 1
  • Michael J. Staufacker
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of EpidemiologyUniversity of Minnesota School of Public HealthMinneapolisUSA

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