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Theories of Adolescent Risk-Taking Behavior

  • Vivien Igra
  • Charles E. IrwinJr.
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

The study of adolescent risk-taking behavior gained prominence in the 1980s as it became increasingly evident that the majority of the morbidity and mortality during the second decade of life was behavioral in origin. The term risk-taking behavior has been used to link, conceptually, a number of potentially health-damaging behaviors including, among others, substance use, precocious or risky sexual behavior, reckless vehicle use, homicidal and suicidal behavior, eating disorders, and delinquency. The linkage of these behaviors under a single domain is theoretically useful because it allows for the investigation of particular behaviors in the context of other behaviors. The construct of risk-taking behavior also suggests a more parsimonious use of interventions, targeting groups of behaviors rather than applying multiple more narrowly targeted interventions.

Keywords

Problem Behavior Risk Behavior Eating Disorder Adolescent Health Sexual Debut 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vivien Igra
    • 1
  • Charles E. IrwinJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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