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Pattern of Midbrain Pathology in Different Parkinsonian Syndromes

  • D. A. McRitchie
  • G. M. Halliday
  • H. Cartwright
  • M. A. Hely
  • J. G. L. Morris
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 47)

Abstract

It is well established that the pattern of cell loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is not uniform throughout the pigmented cell clusters of the substantia nigra. In fact the regional selectivity of degeneration of the pigmented cell clusters in the human substantia nigra is quite striking (Hassler, 1938; Greenfield and Bosanquet, 1953; Bernheimer et al., 1973; Fearnley and Lees, 1991; Gibb and Lees, 1991). Furthermore, the topography of cell loss in patients with different clinical presentations is reported to correlate with specific clinical symptoms (Rinne et al., 1989; Fearnley and Lees, 1991; Paulus and Jellinger, 1991), such that ventrolateral cell loss correlates with rigidity and akinesia while medial cell loss correlates with dementia. The present study extends these clinicopathological correlations by examining the topography of cell loss in patients with similar clinical presentations but varying courses of the disease.

Keywords

Substantia Nigra Cell Loss Cell Cluster Parkinsonian Syndrome Similar Clinical Presentation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. McRitchie
    • 1
  • G. M. Halliday
    • 1
  • H. Cartwright
    • 1
  • M. A. Hely
    • 2
  • J. G. L. Morris
    • 2
  1. 1.Prince of Wales Medical Research InstituteRandwickAustralia
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyWestmead HopsitalWestmeadAustralia

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