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Cortico-Cortical Inhibition in Patients with a Focal Lesion in the Basal Ganglia

  • Ritsuko Hanajima
  • Yoshikazu Ugawa
  • Yasuo Terao
  • Ichiro Kanazawa
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 47)

Abstract

Kujirai et al.(1993) proposed a new technique to investigate ipsilateral cortico-cortical inhibitory connections within the human motor cortex using paired magnetic stimulation. In normal subjects, a subthreshold conditioning stimulus suppressed responses to the suprathreshold test stimulus when it preceded the test stimulus by 1–5 ms. This effect was thought to reflect the function of inhibitory interneurons in the motor cortex. Many inputs to the motor cortex from various areas should influence excitability of such interneurons or output cells of the motor cortex. One of those major inputs is that from basal ganglia through thalamocortical pathways. Such influences must be distorted in basal ganglia disorders. In the present communication, we studied the ipsilateral cortico-cortical inhibition in 3 patients with a focal lesion in the basal ganglia in order to investigate whether changes occur in the above cortico-cortical inhibition (Kujirai et al., 1993) when inputs from the basal ganglia to the motor cortex are damaged.

Keywords

Basal Ganglion Conditioning Stimulus Motor Cortex Test Stimulus Involuntary Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ritsuko Hanajima
    • 1
  • Yoshikazu Ugawa
    • 1
  • Yasuo Terao
    • 1
  • Ichiro Kanazawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Institute for Brain Research, School of MedicineUniversity of TokyoBunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113Japan

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