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Taurine 2 pp 329-331 | Cite as

Ultrastructural Localization of Taurine Immunoreactivity in the Pineal Organ and Retina of the Pigeon

  • N. Lake
  • M. Ueck
  • A. Hach
  • C. Verdone-Smith
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 403)

Abstract

While taurine is ubiquitous in animal tissues, some of the highest levels occur in the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, retina and pineal organ3, 11, 13. This may indicate a role of taurine in processes that are more pronounced in neurosecretory and neurosensory cells than in other cell types. For example, taurine has been shown to interact with membrane phospholipids to alter their Ca2+ binding properties7, and may thus influence Ca2+-dependent processes such as ATPase ion pumps, ion channels flux, or Ca2+-activated events5, 6, many of which contribute to neurosecretion and phototransduction. On the other hand, the large transient ionic fluxes associated with activity of pineal and retinal neurosensory/neurosecretory cells may also impose osmotic stresses that require use of taurine as an osmolyte; there is much evidence concerning a role for taurine in osmoregulation in tissues ranging from marine organisms, to the kidney and the brain5, 6. The pineal organ contains many structures homologous to retinal photoreceptors. We hoped to gain information about the role of taurine in these tissues by examining and comparing the retinal and pineal distribution of endogenous taurine using immunocytochemistry.

Keywords

Pineal Gland Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum Electron Microscope Level Ultrastructural Localization Pineal Organ 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Lake
    • 1
  • M. Ueck
    • 2
  • A. Hach
    • 2
  • C. Verdone-Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Physiology and OphthalmologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Institut für Anatomie und ZytobiologieJustus-Liebig-Universität GiessenGiessenGermany

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