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Stone Tools pp 377-392 | Cite as

Some Comments on a Continuing Debate

  • George H. Odell
  • Brian D. Hayden
  • Jay K. Johnson
  • Marvin Kay
  • Toby A. Morrow
  • Stephen E. Nash
  • Michael S. Nassaney
  • John W. Rick
  • Michael F. Rondeau
  • Steven A. Rosen
  • Michael J. Shott
  • Paul T. Thacker
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The chapters in this volume were discussed thoroughly during the four days of the conference that spawned them. As with most discussions, the tide ebbed and flowed, sometimes centering on the details of a particular paper but often contributing to a better understanding of a more general issue. In this final chapter we have compiled the principal points made, in as readable and logically organized a format as we could muster. Arguments do not necessarily appear here in their original order, and the points made in any particular section may not even have occurred in the same discussion. Every attempt has been made, however, to retain the original intent and context in which the remarks were delivered.

Keywords

Stone Tool Continue Debate American Antiquity Projectile Point Elite Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • George H. Odell
  • Brian D. Hayden
  • Jay K. Johnson
  • Marvin Kay
  • Toby A. Morrow
  • Stephen E. Nash
  • Michael S. Nassaney
  • John W. Rick
  • Michael F. Rondeau
  • Steven A. Rosen
  • Michael J. Shott
  • Paul T. Thacker

There are no affiliations available

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