The Human Implications of Psychiatric Genetics

  • Laura Lee Hall

Abstract

Research involves people. People participate in research. People may benefit from research-driven improvements in clinical practice. And people face social perceptions and policies that stem from research.

Keywords

Depression Europe Income Schizophrenia Anemia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura Lee Hall
    • 1
  1. 1.National Alliance for the Mentally IllArlingtonUSA

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