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Iron Status of a Representative Sample of the French Adult Population

Results from the SU.VI.MAX Study
  • P. Galan
  • P. Preziosi
  • M.-J. M. Alferez
  • A.-M. Roussel
  • D. Malvy
  • A. Paul-Dauphin
  • S. Briancon
  • A. Favier
  • S. Hercberg

Abstract

In industrialized countries, there is growing interest in the association of iron metabolism disturbances with certain health problems (1–4). There exists two major disturbances of iron balance, iron deficiency and iron overload. Paradoxically, little information exists on the iron status of large representative samples of populations, particularly in European countries. Most information about iron nutritional status is based on studies of relatively small population groups (5,6). Few data are available on the iron status of the French population. However, in France, iron fortification of foods is not allowed (except in infant formulas and specialized dietetic products) and the use of iron supplements is therefore uncommon. In the present study, the iron status of a representative sample of the French adult population, issued from the SU.VI.MAX study, was assessed using biochemical indicators.

Keywords

Serum Ferritin Iron Overload Infant Formula Iron Status Biochemical Indicator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Galan
    • 1
  • P. Preziosi
    • 1
  • M.-J. M. Alferez
    • 2
  • A.-M. Roussel
    • 3
  • D. Malvy
    • 4
  • A. Paul-Dauphin
    • 5
  • S. Briancon
    • 5
  • A. Favier
    • 3
  • S. Hercberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut Scientifique et Technique de la Nutrition et l’AlimentationConservatoire National des Arts et MétiersParisFrance
  2. 2.Departamento de FisiologiaUniversidad de GranadaSpain
  3. 3.Laboratoire de BiochimieCHRU de GrenobleFrance
  4. 4.Labo Santé PubliqueCHRU de ToursFrance
  5. 5.Ecole de Santé PubliqueCHRU de NancyFrance

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