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Metal-Ligand Interactions and Trace Metal Bioavailability

  • Guy Berthon

Abstract

The use of metalloelements in human medicine is common practice. As a function of their physico-chemical properties, these elements play distinct roles with respect to life and health. They may therefore be prescribed for a large range of applications, at different doses, and in different chemical forms. Metals considered as essential are frequently administered at dietary levels to compensate for deficiencies. They may also be used at higher doses, to take advantage of their intrinsic pharmacotoxicological properties. In contrast, non-essential metals are used exclusively for their pharmacotoxicological capacities in therapy, or for their special physico-chemical properties in diagnosis.

Keywords

Biological Fluid Bioinorganic Chemistry Metal Metabolism Copper Urinary Excretion Zinc Urinary Excretion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guy Berthon
    • 1
  1. 1.INSERM U305ToulouseFrance

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