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Selenium as a Pharmacological Agent against Heavy Metal Poisoning and Chemical or Physical Carcinogenesis

  • J. Poupon

Abstract

Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element and a constituent of two enzymes, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and type I iodothyronine 5’-deiodinase. GPx is a component of the antioxidant defense system and therefore plays an important role in the detoxification of xenobiotic-induced free radicals. However, most studies assessing the beneficial role of Se against xenobiotics have been conducted in Se-deficient animals. In these models, Se supplementation at nutritional doses restored normal selenium status, so that the effects eventually observed were attributed to a restoration of GPx activity. Other mechanisms may also be involved when higher Se doses are given. This review will focus on the effects of pharmacological doses of Se given to Se-adequate animals. Other reviews of nutritional and epidemiological studies are already available (1–5).

Keywords

Heavy Metal Poisoning Hydrogen Selenide Nutritional Dose Synthetic Organoselenium Compound Ethylmercuric Chloride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Poupon
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire Central de BiochimieHôpital LariboisièreParisFrance

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