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Low Plasma Selenium in Patients Admitted in an Intensive Care Unit is Related to Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Sepsis

  • D. Vitoux
  • X. Forceville
  • R. Gauzit
  • P. Lahilaire
  • A. Combes
  • P. Chappuis

Abstract

The biological role of selenium (Se) has been established since the discovery that Se is a structural component of the active center of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) which is the first recognized selenoprotein. GSH-Px catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and a variety of organic hydroperoxides by glutathione and thus protects the cells from oxidative damage. Therefore Se is a part of a system that provides a defense against the accumulation of lipid peroxides and free radicals that damage cell membranes and macro molecules. However, evidence has now accumulated that this is not the only function of Se (1). There are several other biologically active selenoproteins (2, 3) and Se seems to play a direct role in the regulation of the inflammatory process (4, 5).

Keywords

Severe Sepsis Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Nosocomial Pneumonia Plasma Selenium Enzyme Glutathione Peroxidase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Vitoux
    • 1
  • X. Forceville
    • 2
  • R. Gauzit
    • 2
  • P. Lahilaire
    • 2
  • A. Combes
    • 2
  • P. Chappuis
    • 1
  1. 1.Hôpital LariboisièreLaboratoire Central de BiochimieParisFrance
  2. 2.Centre Hospitalier de MeauxService de Réanimation PolyvalenteMeauxFrance

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