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Normal Memory Aging

  • Katie E. Cherry
  • Anderson D. Smith
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

Elderly people often comment that their memory is not as good as it used to be. Complaints of memory loss vary widely among older adults. Some express little concern over age-related declines in memory, but others show greater worry and concern. Older adults’ concerns are understandable in light of the increased public awareness of memory impairment associated with Alzheimer’s disease (Reisberg, Ferris, deLeon, Crook, & Haynes, 1987). Nonetheless, self-reported memory problems do not necessarily provide an accurate indication of older persons’ performance on laboratory-based measures of memory (Dixon, 1989).

Keywords

Implicit Memory Successful Aging Visual Imagery Memory Complaint Memory Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katie E. Cherry
    • 1
  • Anderson D. Smith
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.School of PsychologyGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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