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Psychodynamic Issues

  • Howard D. Lerner
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

Psychoanalytic theory does not offer a single, coherent account of the aging process across the life cycle. First, psychoanalysis does not represent one unified, tightly knit theory. As explored in the first section of this chapter, psychoanalysis can be represented by four internally consistent theoretical models that, to a large extent, intersect and overlap but that cannot be unified into a single theory. Each model offers its own perspective on geropsychology. Second, from the perspective of psychoanalytic theorists and clinicians, issues involving geropsychology are far too complex and multidetermined to elaborate in terms of a single thread or dimension. In this chapter, therefore, aging will be examined in terms of eight “dimensions of development.” These dimensions, as will be articulated, interdigitate with one another in complex ways. However, for heuristic reasons, each will be considered separately in order to offer some idea of the rich tapestry that comprises geriatric psychology from the perspective of psychoanalytic theory.

Keywords

Object Representation Psychoanalytic Theory Formal Operation Transitional Object Object Relation Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard D. Lerner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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