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Clinical Geropsychology and U.S. Federal Policy

  • Gary R. VandenBos
  • Patrick H. DeLeon
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

The age distribution in American society has changed drastically since 1900 when only one in 25 Americans was age 65 or older, and the average life span was 47 years. In the year 2000 one in six Americans will be age 65 or older, and the average life span will exceed 80 (Neugarten & Neugarten, 1989).

Keywords

Mental Health Service Social Security American Psychological Association Federal Policy Home Health Care 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary R. VandenBos
    • 1
  • Patrick H. DeLeon
    • 2
  1. 1.American Psychological AssociationUSA
  2. 2.U.S. SenateHart Senate BuildingUSA

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