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Personality Disorders

  • Bunny Falk
  • Daniel L. Segal
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss personality disorders in older adults. After a brief look at the evolution of the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; American Psychiatric Association) category Personality Disorders itself, and description of the disorders contained therein, our focus shifts to diagnosis and assessment of these Axis II disorders in older adults. Thereafter, we present viable treatment options available to the clinician. As we show, theoretical and research interest has varied greatly from disorder to disorder (Peterson, 1996), thus, treatment approaches for some disorders have a firmer empirical foundation than others.

Keywords

Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Schizotypal Personality Disorder Sonality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bunny Falk
    • 1
  • Daniel L. Segal
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Psychological StudiesNova Southeastern UniversityFort LauderdaleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Colorado at Colorado SpringsColorado SpringsUSA

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