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Development of Novel Technologies for the Synthesis of Biodegradable Pegylated Nanoparticles

  • Maria Teresa Peracchia
  • Didier Desmaële
  • Christine Vauthier
  • Denis Labarre
  • Elias Fattal
  • Jean d’Angelo
  • Patrick Couvreur
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 300)

Abstract

Polymeric injectable carriers, able to deliver drugs or other compounds to specific sites of action for a prolonged time, represent a potential therapeutic approach for several diseases. However, therapeutic activity is compromised by particle recognition by the macrophages of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) and their elimination within seconds, or minutes after intravenous injection. Blood proteins (opsonins) adsorb onto the particles surface, making them recognizable to the macrophages of the MPS.

Keywords

Anionic Polymerization Polymerization Medium Mononuclear Phagocyte System Amphiphilic Copolymer Surface Chemical Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Teresa Peracchia
    • 1
  • Didier Desmaële
    • 2
  • Christine Vauthier
    • 1
  • Denis Labarre
    • 1
  • Elias Fattal
    • 1
  • Jean d’Angelo
    • 2
  • Patrick Couvreur
    • 1
  1. 1.URA CNRS 1218, Faculty of PharmacyUniversity of Paris-Sud XIFrance
  2. 2.URA CNRS 1843, Faculty of PharmacyUniversity of Paris-Sud XIFrance

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