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Dissociative Women’s Experiences of Self-Cutting

  • Faith A. Robinson

Abstract

This research was developed to discover the essence of the phenomenon of nonsuicidal, self-cutting behavior among highly dissociative persons. Because of their own personal fears grounded in a lack of understanding, therapists, emergency room personnel, and crisis intervention workers often back away from or are ill prepared to help nonsuicidal self-cutters who have dissociative disorders. Subsequently, professional ignorance about self-cutting often leads self-cutters to withdrawal, isolation, and increased shame and guilt. Many of the women who participated in this study had not revealed their self-cutting behaviors to anyone except their therapist; often, their therapists had not asked for details about their cutting behaviors. In fact, I heard three of these women say, “No one ever asked me about this.”

Keywords

Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Initial Data Collection Dissociative Identity Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Faith A. Robinson
    • 1
  1. 1.CarmelUSA

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