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Latin American Women’s Experience of Feeling Able to Move Toward and Accomplish a Meaningful and Challenging Goal

  • Tania Shertock

Abstract

This chapter presents an existential-phenomenological study of, specifically, Latin American women’s experience of feeling able to move toward and accomplish a meaningful and challenging goal. The purpose of the study was threefold: (1) to elucidate the experience being investigated, (2) to add to the literature exploring women’s consciousness, and (3) to study the psychology of women who have had this experience, as well as the psychology of women in Latin America.

Keywords

Challenging Goal Executive Female Fundamental Description Gender Schema Theory Psychological Androgyny 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tania Shertock
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Transpersonal PsychologySan FranciscoUSA

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