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An Empirical-Phenomenological Investigation of Being-Ashamed

  • Damian S. Vallelonga

Abstract

This chapter presents a formulation of the essential lived structure of being-ashamed derived from an empirical-phenomenological analysis of the descriptions of various subjects’ situated experiences of the phenomenon. The research project and its results, from which this chapter is derived, were originally reported in my doctoral dissertation (Vallelonga, 1986). It has been ten years since that dissertation was completed and defended, and at least 12 books have been written on shame in the interim (Albers, 1995; Bradshaw, 1988; Broucek, 1991; Fossum & Mason, 1986; Harper & Hoopes, 1990; Kaufman, 1989; Lewis, 1992; Middleton-Moz, 1990; Nathanson, 1992; Nichols, 1991; Potter-Efron, 1989; Tangney & Fischer, 1995). Given the publication of so many books (not to mention articles) on the topic, the reader may legitimately ask if there is anything left to say about this phenomenon. There is much to say!

Keywords

Future World Dialectical Relationship Negative Person Bodily Weakness Negative Valuation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Damian S. Vallelonga
    • 1
  1. 1.SyracuseUSA

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