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On Being with Suffering

  • Patricia A. Qualls

Abstract

Each day the television news is filled with film of dying children, slaughtered human beings, starving and war-ravaged humanity. Each day millions of people watch and then do something with that which they have witnessed. They may store it, ignore it, harden to it, self-medicate, or respond to it with action. Suffering is not only on our televisions, it is in our lives.

Keywords

Theme Cluster Walk Away Happy Ending National League Innocent Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia A. Qualls
    • 1
  1. 1.CarmelUSA

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