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Transpersonal Awareness

Implications for Phenomenological Research
  • Ron Valle

Abstract

Phenomenological psychology invites us not just to an awareness of another perspective with a previously unrecognized body of knowledge, but to a radically different way of being-in-the-world. In addition, this different way of being leads naturally to a different mode or practice of inquiry—the methods of phenomenological research. This chapter will compare phenomenological psychology to the more mainstream behavioral and psychoanalytic approaches (Valle, 1989), present the essence of the existential-phenomenological perspective (Valle, King, & Halling, 1989), discuss the distinctions between the existential and transpersonal world-views, and then describe the nature of an emerging transpersonal-phenomenological psychology (Valle, 1995).

Keywords

Phenomenological Research Pure Consciousness Reflective Awareness Transcendent Experience Psychoanalytic Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ron Valle
    • 1
  1. 1.Awakening: A Center for Exploring Living and DyingWalnut CreekUSA

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