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Nylon 66, Nylon 46 and PET Phase Transfer Catalyzed Alkaline Depolymerization at Atmospheric Pressure

  • Malcolm B. Polk
  • Leighton L. Laboeuf
  • Munish Shah
  • Chee-Youb Won
  • Xiaodong Hu
  • Wen Ding

Abstract

Plastic waste recycling is beneficial because it can lead to a reduction in the amount of waste generated, a decreased need for landfills, and a more rational utilization of resources. An important source of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) for recycling is physically cleaned post-consumer bottles which are ground to form flake, depolymerized, purified, and repolymerized to form recycled resin bottles. Caustic treatment of polyester scrap involves cleavage of the ester linkages. The reaction of aqueous sodium hydroxide (8–10% by weight) with waste material in an autoclave at 210–250°C and elevated pressure goes to completion in about 3–5 hours1. The rate of hydrolysis may be enhanced by the presence of accelerants2,3. Terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol may be recovered from the solution. Hall3 used cetyl trimethylammonium bromide and lauryl dimethylbenzylammonium chloride as accelerants for the caustic reduction of PET.

Keywords

Phase Transfer Adipic Acid Terephthalic Acid Aqueous Sodium Hydroxide Viscosity Average Molecular Weight 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    H. Ludewig. Polyester Fibres: Chemistry and Technology, Wiley, New York (1971).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A.J. Hall, Modifying polyester fibers to get sheer, silky fabrics, Textile World. 113(9): 108 (1963).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    S.M. Gawish, M. Gourgeois, and G. Ambroise, New quarternary surfactants for alkaline hydrolysis of polyesters, Am. Dyest. Rep. 73(12):37 (1984).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    B.M. Miller, U.S. Patent 2,840,606 (1958).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    J. Thorburn, U.S. Patent 3,223,731 (1965).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm B. Polk
    • 1
  • Leighton L. Laboeuf
    • 1
  • Munish Shah
    • 1
  • Chee-Youb Won
    • 1
  • Xiaodong Hu
    • 1
  • Wen Ding
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Textile and Fiber EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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