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Uses of the Past in Adult Psychological Health

Objective, Historical, and Narrative Realities
  • Harvey Peskin
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

If being adult is being fully grown up, then adult development is something of an oxymoron. But not if we take it as we take adult entertainment: intended only for adults; not suitable for children. We begin with this bit of conceptual hyperbole to highlight the sense that development in adulthood marches to a different drama than in childhood. Nevertheless, just as there is obviously no well-developed child apart from a well-developing one, there is no well-developed adult. Such, essentially, was Jung’s (1933) complaint to Freud: not against the validity of libido theory itself, but with Freud’s failure to recognize that the second half of life (“the psychology of the afternoon,” Jung called it) had passed beyond the aims of psychosexuality to follow now utterly new directions and seize new terms of being, rather than to stay put, protecting the winnings of the first half (“the psychology of the morning”) from dwindling any further.

Keywords

Late Adolescence Late Life Late Adulthood Adolescent Behavior Adult Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harvey Peskin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySan Francisco State UniversitySan FranciscoUSA

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