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Psychoanalysis, the Life Story, and Aging

Creating New Meanings within Narratives of Lived Experience
  • Bertram J. Cohler
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

Datan et al. (1987), extending Neugarten’s (1984) earlier observation regarding the significance of the manner in which persons recount the story of their lives, well portray both the manner in which contemporary psychoanalysis understands the course of life and emphasize the goal of psychoanalytic study of adult lives as a search for factors accounting for a presently constructed story of experience and the determinant of wish and action. The present chapter focuses on the significance of contemporary clinical theory within psychoanalysis, additionally informed by study within the human sciences, as a means for understanding the management of lived experience reflected in the successively rewritten life story from childhood to oldest adulthood. These life stories, told by the analysand to the analyst, provide the foundation for a shared effort at remaking accounts of lived experience in an effort to provide the analysand with increased sense of personal integrity and vitality.

Keywords

Life Story Adult Development Standard Edition Life Review Personal Past 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bertram J. Cohler
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Aging, Health, and SocietyUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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