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Disorders, Symptoms, and Their Pharmacotherapy

  • Kelly Botteron
  • Barbara Geller

Abstract

In this chapter, the issue of the relationship of diagnoses and dimensions to potential pharmacotherapeutic agents will be examined. The scope of this chapter does not include differential diagnoses, nor does it claim to cover the clinical aspects of any disorder in detail. For more in-depth diagnostic considerations, the reader should consult more comprehensive diagnostic texts in child and adolescent psychiatry.1–3

Keywords

Mlijor Depressive Disorder Anxiety Disorder Oppositional Defiant Disorder Tourette Syndrome Pervasive Developmental Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kelly Botteron
    • 1
  • Barbara Geller
    • 2
  1. 1.Mallinckrodt Institute of RadiologyWashington University School of MedicineMissouriUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryWashington University School of MedicineMissouriUSA

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