Monitoring and Measuring Drug Effects. II. Behavioral, Emotional, and Cognitive Effects

  • Michael G. Aman
  • Deborah A. Pearson

Abstract

This chapter surveys methods of assessment that have been and can be used by practitioners clinically for assessing drug effects. The authors have assumed that most practitioners will have limited resources, and therefore decisions had to be made in choosing two or three of the best approaches for assessing a given behavior or function. This does not mean that there are not other good tests and scales available—simply that a line had to be drawn to offer clinicians a practical number of alternatives. While the emphasis is on the practitioner’s need, hopefully the information presented will also aid in clinical trials and the interpretion of their results.

Keywords

Depression Schizophrenia Caffeine Lime Haloperidol 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael G. Aman
    • 1
  • Deborah A. Pearson
    • 2
  1. 1.The Nisonger Center for Mental Retardation and Developmental DisabilitiesOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Texas Health Science CenterHoustonUSA

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