Anxiolytics, Sedatives, and Miscellaneous Drugs

  • John Scott Werry
  • Michael G. Aman

Abstract

This chapter contains discussions of anxiolytics and sedatives and several miscellaneous drugs that do not fit naturally into the remaining drug chapters. Included here are reviews of central nervous system (CNS) depressants (such as the benzodiazepines), antihistamines and anticholinergics, and atypical anxiolytics. Under the rubric of “miscellaneous drugs,” we have included Clonidine and guanfacine, melatonin, hypericin, tryptophan and 5-hydroxytryptophan, fenfluramine, the ß-blockers, and the opiate antagonists.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Scott Werry
    • 1
  • Michael G. Aman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.The Nisonger Center for Mental Retardation and Developmental DisabilitiesOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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