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Archaeology on Trial

  • R. Duncan MathewsonIII
Part of the The Springer Series in Underwater Archaeology book series (SSUA)

Abstract

Finding the hull of the Atocha took 16 years. Recovering the cultural wealth of the site could take even longer. The wrecks of the 1715 treasure fleet, first located in the 1960s, are still yielding valuable archaeological information and quite a bit of treasure. While Kane’s dramatic discovery of the main pile ended Mel Fisher’s quest, for the archaeological team this is only the first phase of a long, arduous process. I can’t predict how long it will take to raise, clean, catalog, preserve, and then study and report on the 300,000 or so artifacts we eventually expect to recover from the Atocha and Margarita. Mel has won his battle with history, but for me, the archaeology of the project is still very much on trial.

Keywords

Patch Reef Recreational Diver Wreck Site Treasure Hunt Underwater Archaeology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Selected Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Duncan MathewsonIII

There are no affiliations available

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