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Proconsul

Function and Phylogeny
  • Alan Walker
Part of the Advances in Primatology book series (AIPR)

Abstract

The genus Proconsul was recognized over 60 years ago as the first Miocene anthropoid from sub-Saharan Africa (Hopwood, 1933). The collections of Proconsul fossils have grown steadily since then, so that it is now probably the best-known Miocene primate. We have hundreds of fossils of several species from many localities in Kenya and Uganda. Nearly every body part is now represented and much is known about sexual dimorphism, body proportions, growth and development, and paleoecology. Because of this, the functional anatomy of the genus is relatively well known.

Keywords

Sexual Dimorphism Radial Head World Monkey Frontal Sinus Postcranial Skeleton 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Anthropology and BiologyThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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