The Entrapment of Polyethylene Glycol-Conjugated Adenosine Deaminase (Pegademase) and Native Adenosine Deaminase in Human Carrier Erythrocytes

  • Bridget E. Bax
  • Lynette D. Fairbanks
  • Murray D. Bain
  • H. Anne Simmonds
  • Ronald A. Chalmers

Abstract

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1:66 000. It is characterised by a defective humoral (hypogammaglobulinaemia) and cellular (lymphopenia) immunity and if untreated is severe and often lethal. Some 20% to 25% of SCID cases are due to a deficiency of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4). Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is normally present in all mammalian cells and catalyses the deamination of adenosine and 2′-deoxyadenosine to inosine and 2′-deoxyinosine respectively for either salvage and re-utilisation or metabolism to uric acid and excretion. The major route of adenosine metabolism at physiological substrate levels is phosphorylation rather than deamination, this is because the K m for adenosine kinase (EC 2.7.1.20) is lower than that of ADA. Adenosine in excess of physiological levels is degraded by ADA. The major source of 2′-deoxyadenosine is DNA turnover and the main route of its metabolism is deamination by ADA.

Keywords

HPLC Catalysis Polyethylene Glycol Adenosine 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bridget E. Bax
    • 1
  • Lynette D. Fairbanks
    • 2
  • Murray D. Bain
    • 1
  • H. Anne Simmonds
    • 2
  • Ronald A. Chalmers
    • 1
  1. 1.Paediatric Metabolism Unit, Department of Child HealthSt George’s Hospital Medical SchoolLondonUK
  2. 2.The Purine Research LaboratoriesGuy’s HospitalLondonUK

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