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Questionnaires and Checklists

  • Steven Beck
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Assessment instruments that are completed by adults in reference to a child’s behavior can be used by clinicians to assess children’s behavioral problems and psychological characteristics. Surveys of clinicians from different therapeutic orientations indicate that rating scales and checklists are helpful in their clinical practice (Piotrowski & Keller, 1984; Wade & Baker, 1977). Yet, in a survey of child clinical and school psychologists’ assessment methods for children with hyperactive characteristics, interviews, behavioral observations, standardized IQ tests, and drawing tasks were preferred over checklists (Rosenberg & Beck, 1986). As discussed throughout this book, one assessment method should not be considered superior and used independently of other assessment strategies. Yet, given the attractive features of checklists, it is surprising that these instruments are not used more extensively by clinicians. Checklists have also often been ignored in previous discussions of child behavior assessment (Wilson & Prentice-Dunn, 1981).

Keywords

Child Behavior Personality Inventory Behavior Rate Scale Clinical Child Psychology Western Psychological Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Beck
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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