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Hearing Impairment

  • William J. Helsel
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Audition plays an important role in our everyday functioning. One’s ears serve to locate sources of sound within the environment and also serve in orientation. Physiologists are aware that localization of sound is lateral, or left to right. Detection of sound by hearing persons, if the source of stimuli is in front or behind, is accomplished by transforming the discrimination to a lateral decision by turning the head. Wallach, Newman, and Rosenzweig (1949) demonstrated that the human ear can, to a fraction of a millisecond, detect and discriminate whether the sound entered the left or the right ear first. Hearing has been described as ubiquitous, multidirectional, and mandatory (Altshuler, 1974; Myklebust, 1960). Audition has also been shown to play a major role in information processing. As a sensory registrar, it serves as a major source of information about our environment (Moray, Bates, & Barnett, 1965). Conrad and colleagues (Conrad, 1964, 1972; Conrad & Hull, 1964) have demonstrated the importance of acoustics to short-term memory of hearing persons and more important, the reliance on visual stimuli of deaf persons for short-term memory. Further review of the research on audition could fill this volume, but the conclusion drawn from such a review can be condensed into one sentence: Audition is integral to everyday functioning and survival.

Keywords

Hearing Impairment Emotional Disturbance American Sign Deaf Child Impaired Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Helsel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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