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Assessment of Attention Deficit Disorder and Hyperactivity

  • Richard J. Morris
  • Scott J. Collier
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Of all the behavioral disturbances in children, perhaps none is so intriguing to clinicians, educators, and parents alike as is the disorder called attention deficit disorder (ADD), often referred to in the past as hyperactivity or hyperkinesis. This disorder represents one of the most common reasons for referral to school psychologists and/or child guidance and mental health clinics and has one of the longest histories of research and study in the area of childhood behavior disorders. ADD is typically viewed as a developmental disorder of social conduct and self-control that involves deficits in attention and academic achievement and that involves a long-term course that may begin as early as infancy or early childhood and continue through adolescence (e. g., Barkley, 1981a, 1983; Friman & Christophersen, 1983).

Keywords

Cognitive Style Conduct Disorder Child Psychiatry Attention Deficit Disorder Hyperactive Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard J. Morris
    • 1
  • Scott J. Collier
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Education, School Psychology ProgramUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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