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African Hemorrhagic Fevers Caused by Marburg and Ebola Viruses

  • Robert E. Shope
  • James M. Meegan

Abstract

Marburg and Ebola viruses are morphologically and genetically similar, immunologically distinct rod-shaped agents in the family Filoviridae. They produce acute hemorrhagic fever in man.(41a) Although other viruses cause a rather similar disease in Africa and differential diagnosis of a sporadic case cannot be made on clinical grounds, the syndrome associated with infection by these two agents is sufficiently unique and unvarying to distinguish it from yellow fever, Lassa fever, and other infections whenever a cluster of cases occurs. For this reason, the term African hemorrhagic fever (AFHF), rather than Marburg or Ebola disease, is used here to refer to clinical infection caused by either virus. Explosive emergence, high mortality, nosocomial secondary transmission, and ecological mystery have combined to draw worldwide attention to these infections.

Keywords

Nonhuman Primate Yellow Fever Haemorrhagic Fever Lassa Fever Acute Viral Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. Shope
    • 1
  • James M. Meegan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PathologyThe University of Texas Medical Branch at GalvestonGalvestonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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