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Thymus in Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis

Transplantation of Thymoma and Extrathymomal Thymic Tissue into SCID Mice
  • A. Sarropoulos
  • A. Marx
  • R. Hohlfeld
  • H. Wekerle
  • Simone Spuler

Abstract

The SCID mouse model of myasthenia gravis (MG) has given some insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune MG associated with lymphofollicular hyperplasia of the thymus1,2. In this model, small pieces of thymic tissue were transplanted under the kidney capsule of SCID mice. The transplant induced a longlasting production of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies (anti-AchR-abs) in these mice. In contrast, the injection of single cell suspensions containing 100fold more cells than thymus transplant resulted only in an initial, transient rise of anti-AchR-abs. When investigated immunohistochemically, the transplants had retained the characteristic features of thymus tissue. Some myoid cells had differentiated further into myotubes. This study demonstrated that the hyperplastic thymus in autoimmune MG contains all elements necessary to induce and maintain an immune response against the AchR.

Keywords

SCID Mouse Thymic Carcinoma Thymic Tissue Kidney Capsule Myoid Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Sarropoulos
    • 1
  • A. Marx
    • 2
  • R. Hohlfeld
    • 1
    • 3
  • H. Wekerle
    • 1
  • Simone Spuler
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of NeuroimmunologyMax-Planck-InstituteMartinsriedGermany
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyUniversity of MunichGermany
  3. 3.Department of PathologyUniversity of WürzburgGermany

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