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Past and Recent Studies of Prosopagnosia

  • Hadyn D. Ellis

Abstract

Prosopagnosia is usually characterised by a sudden loss in ability to recognise faces of familiar people. Sufferers typically have then to rely on voices or dress for identifying spouse, family, friends or famous individuals; and, not infrequently, do not even recognise themselves in the mirror. Before discussing prosopagnosia in more detail, I should like to give an outline account of some of the historical landmarks in its identification and investigation. In doing so I shall not attempt to give a comprehensive review of the literature: instead the more significant papers will be briefly mentioned.

Keywords

Face Recognition Face Processing Face Perception Familiar People Delusional Misidentification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

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  • Hadyn D. Ellis

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