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Analysis of Dendritic Cells at the Genetic Level

  • Gill Marland
  • Franca C. Hartgers
  • Remco Veltkamp
  • Monika F. C. Königswieser
  • Dan Gorman
  • Terrill McClanahan
  • Carl G. Figdor
  • Gosse J. Adema
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Summary

To increase our understanding of dendritic cell (DC) function we have used two approaches to search at the genetic level for molecules which are specifically expressed by these cells. First, we have performed random sequencing of cDNA libraries prepared from DC. Second, we have employed differential display PCR (DD-PCR). DD-PCR is a powerful technique for the identification at the RNA level of molecules which are expressed in a cell type-specific manner. In our study, we have compared RNA from DC with RNA from a panel of leukocyte cell lines. Here we present a summary of our findings using these two approaches, and show that both methods are complementary and can be used to identify molecules that are specific to DC.

Keywords

Dendritic Cell cDNA Library Mannose Receptor Dendritic Cell Function Major Histocompatability Complex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gill Marland
    • 1
  • Franca C. Hartgers
    • 1
  • Remco Veltkamp
    • 1
  • Monika F. C. Königswieser
    • 1
  • Dan Gorman
    • 2
  • Terrill McClanahan
    • 2
  • Carl G. Figdor
    • 1
  • Gosse J. Adema
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Tumor ImmunologyUniversity Hospital NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.DNAX Research InstitutePalo AltoUSA

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