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In Vitro HIV Infection of Dendritic Cell Precursors

Effect on Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Function
  • Bruno Canque
  • Michelle Rosenzwajg
  • Sandrine Camus
  • Micael Yagello
  • Martine Guigon
  • Jean Claude Gluckman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Abstract

Cells from the dendritic lineage presumably play an important role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection1,2. Langerhans cells (LC), are probably among the first targets for HIV in genital mucosae3,4. Later, in T-cell dependent areas of lymphoid organs, dendritic cells (DC) may also be involved in both virus transmission to CD4+ T cells and the generation of an effective anti-HIV immune response2. There is now agreement that mature DC/LC can take up the virus, reverse transcribe its RNA, cluster to and form syncytia with CD4+ T cells, but the real degree of their permissivity to HIV still remains debated1,5,6. A precise knowledge of the relationships of cells of the DC lineage with HIV is important for understanding AIDS pathogenesis as well as for delineating possible new immunotherapy strategies. Studying their interactions with HIV in different models is therefore warranted.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Infected Culture Dendritic Cell Differentiation Dendritic Cell Precursor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruno Canque
    • 1
  • Michelle Rosenzwajg
    • 1
  • Sandrine Camus
    • 1
  • Micael Yagello
    • 1
  • Martine Guigon
    • 1
  • Jean Claude Gluckman
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire d’Immunologie Biologique and Laboratoire d’Immunologie Cellulaire de l’Ecole Pratique des Hautes EtudesFaculté de médecine and hôpital de la Pitié-SalpêtrièreParis Cedex 13France

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