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Induction of FcεRIα mRNA and Protein Synthesis by Interleukin 4 in CD34+ Cells-Derived Cd1a+ Dendritic Cells

  • Roland Magerstaedt
  • Stefan Kraft
  • Isolde Strobel
  • Maren Jürgens
  • Daniel Hanau
  • Joerg Wessendorf
  • Thomas Bieber
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Abstract

IgE-bearing human epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) are suspected of playing a key role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD). We and others have shown that these cells bind IgE via the high affinity receptor Fc epsilon RI (FcεRI) (1, 2). Recent findings have shown that the expression of this receptor on LC and related dendritic cells in the skin is highly upregulated in lesions skin of AD when compared with nonatopic individuals and this is correlated to a high IgE serum levels (3). Functionally, LC from normal skin differ from those of atopic skin in terms of calcium mobilization upon receptor ligation (4). Beside qualitative alterations in the activation cascade, unresponsiveness also may be related to inefficient triggering in normal LC displaying low amounts of receptors. Thus, the variations in receptor expression may be crucial for the outcome of the signal transduction initiated by FcεRI-cross-linking on LC, implying the need of a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating the receptor display on LC. However, detailed functional, biochemical and molecular biological analysis of FcεRI + LC is hampered by the limited number of LC routinely obtained from skin biopsies or surgical samples. Recently several cytokines, especially granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), have been identified that speed the development of dendritic cells from blood and bone marrow precursors in suspension cultures (5, 6, 7, 8, 9). We took advantage of this progress to establish a model for the study of the regulation of FcεRI on LC and other dendritic cells.

Keywords

Dendritic Cell Atopic Dermatitis Calcium Mobilization Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cell Bone Marrow Precursor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roland Magerstaedt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stefan Kraft
    • 1
  • Isolde Strobel
    • 1
  • Maren Jürgens
    • 1
  • Daniel Hanau
    • 3
  • Joerg Wessendorf
    • 1
  • Thomas Bieber
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyMunichGermany
  2. 2.Genzentrum of Ludwig-Maximilians-University of MunichMunichGermany
  3. 3.Laboratoire d’HistocompatibiliteEtablissement Regional deTransfusion SanguineStrasbourgFrance

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