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Mannose Receptor Mediated Uptake of Antigens Strongly Enhances HLA-Class II Restricted Antigen Presentation by Cultured Dendritic Cells

  • M. C. Agnes A. Tan
  • A. Mieke Mommaas
  • Jan Wouter Drijfhout
  • Reina Jordens
  • Jos J. M. Onderwater
  • Desiree Verwoerd
  • Aat A. Mulder
  • Annette N. van der Heiden
  • Tom H. M. Ottenhoff
  • Marina Cella
  • Abraham Tulp
  • Jacques J. Neefjes
  • Frits Koning
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Summary

Dendritic cells (DCs) use macropinocytosis and mannose receptor mediated endocytosis for the uptake of exogenous antigens. Here we show that the endocytosis of the mannose receptor and mannosylated antigen is distinct from that of a non-mannosylated antigen. Shortly after internalization, however, both mannosylated and non-mannosylated antigen are found in an MIIC like compartment. The mannose receptor itself does not reach this compartment, and probably releases its ligand in an earlier endosomal structure. Finally, we found that mannosylation of peptides strongly enhanced their potency to stimulate HLA class II-restricted peptide-specific T cell clones. Our results indicate that mannosylation of antigen leads to selective targeting and subsequent superior presentation by DCs which may be useful for vaccine design.

Keywords

Dendritic Cell Mannose Receptor Endocytic Compartment Fluid Phase Endocytosis Ultrathin Cryosections 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. C. Agnes A. Tan
    • 1
  • A. Mieke Mommaas
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jan Wouter Drijfhout
    • 1
  • Reina Jordens
    • 1
  • Jos J. M. Onderwater
    • 2
  • Desiree Verwoerd
    • 4
  • Aat A. Mulder
    • 3
  • Annette N. van der Heiden
    • 1
  • Tom H. M. Ottenhoff
    • 1
  • Marina Cella
    • 5
  • Abraham Tulp
    • 4
  • Jacques J. Neefjes
    • 4
  • Frits Koning
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Immunohematology and Blood BankUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory for Electron MicroscopyUSA
  3. 3.Department of DermatologyLeiden University HospitalLeidenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Division of Cellular BiochemistryThe Netherlands Cancer InstituteAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Basel Institute for ImmunologyBaselSwitserland

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