Advertisement

Archaeology, Style, and the Theory of Coevolution

  • Kenneth M. Ames
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Durham’s (1991) dual inheritance theory of coevolution provides a coherent basis for applying Darwinian theory to socio-culture change. His theory rests on three hypotheses: (1) Decision making by individuals is the primary but not only cause of cultural evolution. Humans actively choose among alternative courses of action, when they are able; selection is based on evaluation of the consequences of different alternatives. Since knowledge is imperfect, the outcomes will be imperfect. Choices in cultural selection are made on the basis of learned cultural values. Cultural values are socially transmitted between individuals and generations. (2) The relationships between culture and genes are mediated through five modes. These modes constitute coevolution. (3) In general, “cultural variants which improve the reproductive fitness of their selectors will spread through a population by choice or imposition at the expense of alternative variants.”

Keywords

Natural Selection Reference Group Cultural Evolution Transmission Force Inclusive Fitness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ames, K.M., in press, Art and Regional Interaction Among Affluent Foragers on the North Pacific Rim, in: Development of Hunting-Gathering-Fishing Maritime Societies on the Pacific (A.B. Onat, ed.), Washington State University Press, Pullman.Google Scholar
  2. Bettinger, R.L., 1990, Hunter-Gatherers: Archaeological and Evolutionary Theory, Plenum Press, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Binford, L.R., 1962, Anthropology as Archaeology, American Antiquity 2 (2): 217–228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Borden, C.C., 1983, Prehistoric Art in the Lower Fraser Region, in: Indian Art Traditions of the Northwest Coast ( R.L. Carlson, ed.), Simon Fraser University Press, Burnaby, pp. 131–166.Google Scholar
  5. Bourdieu, P., 1977, Outline of a Theory of Practice, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Boyd, R., and Richerson, P.J., 1985, Culture and the Evolutionary Process, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  7. Braun, D.P., 1991, Are There Cross-cultural Regularities in Tribal Social Practices? in: Between Bands and States: Sedentism, Subsistence and Interaction in Small Scale Societies (S. Gregg, ed.), Occasional Paper No. 9, Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, pp. 423–444.Google Scholar
  8. Carlson, R.L., 1983a, Prehistory of the Northwest Coast, in: Indian Art Traditions of the Northwest Coast ( R.L. Carlson, ed.), Simon Fraser University Press, Burnaby, pp. 13–32.Google Scholar
  9. Carlson, R.L., 1983b, Indian Art Traditions of the Northwest Coast, Simon Fraser University Press, Burnaby.Google Scholar
  10. Carlson, R.L., 1991, The Northwest Coast Before A.D. 1600, in: Proceedings of the Great Ocean Conferences, Volume 1, The Oregon Historical Society, Portland, pp. 109–137.Google Scholar
  11. Carlson, R.L., 1992, Paleo-Shamanism on the Northwest Coast, Paper presented at the 45th Annual Northwest Conference, Burnaby.Google Scholar
  12. Cole, D., 1985, Captured Heritage, The Scramble for Northwest Coast Artifacts, University of Washington Press, Seattle.Google Scholar
  13. Cole, D., and Chaikin, I., 1990, An Iron Hand Upon the People: The Law Against the Potlatch on the Northwest Coast, University of Washington Press, Seattle.Google Scholar
  14. Conkey, M.W., and Hastorf, C.A., 1990, The Uses of Style in Archaeology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  15. Croes, D.R., 1988, The Significance of the 3000 B.P. Hoko River Waterlogged Fishing Camp in our Understanding of Southern Northwest Coast Cultural Evolution, in: Wet Site Archaeology ( B.A. Purdy, ed.), The Teilford Press, Caldwell, pp. 131–152.Google Scholar
  16. Croes, D.R., and Hackenberger, S., 1988, Hoko River Archaeological Complex: Modeling Prehistoric Northwest Coast Economic Evolution, Research in Economic Anthropology Supplement 3: 19–86.Google Scholar
  17. Davis, W., 1990, Style and History in Art History, in: The Uses of Style in Archaeology ( M.W. Con-key and C.A. Hastorf, eds.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 18–31.Google Scholar
  18. Dunnell, R.C., 1978, Style and Function: A Fundamental Dichotomy, American Antiquity 43: 192–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Dunnell, R.C., 1980, Evolutionary Theory and Archaeology, in: Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory, Vol. 6, ( M.B. Schiffer, ed.), Academic Press, New York, pp. 35–99.Google Scholar
  20. Dunnell, R.C., 1992, What is it that Actually Evolves?, Paper Presented at the 57th Annual Meetings of the Society for American Archaeology. Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  21. Durham, W.H., 1991, Coevolution: Genes, Culture, and Human Diversity, Stanford University Press, Stanford.Google Scholar
  22. Eldredge, N., 1986, Information, Economics and Evolution, Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 17: 351–369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Fladmark, K.R., Nelson, D.E., Brown, T.A., Vogel, J.S., and Southen, J.R., 1987, AMS Dating of Two Wooden Artifacts from the Northwest Coast, Canadian Journal of Archaeology 11:1–12.Google Scholar
  24. Gellner, E., 1988, Plough, Sword and Book: The Structure of Human History, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  25. Giddens, A., 1984, The Constitution of Society, Outline of the Theory of Structuration, University of California Press, Berkeley.Google Scholar
  26. Gould, S.J., 1989, Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History, Norton, New York. Hamilton, W.D., 1964, The Genetical Evolution of Social Behavior: l and 11, Journal of Theoretical Biology 7: 1–52.Google Scholar
  27. Holm, B., 1965, Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form, Monograph No. 1, Thomas Burke Memorial Museum, University of Washington Press, Seattle.Google Scholar
  28. Inglis, R., 1976, `Wet’ Site Distribution—The Northern Case GbTo 33—The Lachane Site, in: The Excavation of Water-Saturated Archaeological Sites (Wet Sites) on the Northwest Coast of North America, (D. Croes, ed.), Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper No. 50. National Museums of Canada Mercury Series, Ottawa, pp. 71–108.Google Scholar
  29. Johnson, A.W., and Earle, T.. 1987, The Evolution of Human Societies from Foraging Group to Agrarian State, Stanford University Press. Stanford.Google Scholar
  30. Jonaitas, A., 1985, Art of the Northern Tlingit, University of Washington Press, Seattle.Google Scholar
  31. Keesing, R., 1974, Theories of Culture, Annual Review of Anthropology 3: 73–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Lukes, S., 1974, Power: A Radical View, Macmillan and Co., London.Google Scholar
  33. McMillan, A.D., and Nelson, D.E., 1989, Visual Punning and the Whales Tail: AMS Dating of a Marpole-age Art Object, Canadian Journal of Archaeology 13: 212–218.Google Scholar
  34. Matson, R.G., 1976, The Glenrose Cannery Site, Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper No. 52. National Museums of Canada Mercury Series, Ottawa.Google Scholar
  35. Mayr, E., 1982, The Growth of Biological Thought: Diversity, Evolution, and Inheritance, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  36. Millett, M., 1990, The Romanization of Britain, An Essay in Archaeological Interpretation, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  37. Mithen, S.J., 1989, Evolutionary Theory and Post-Processual Archaeology, Antiquity 63: 483–494.Google Scholar
  38. O’Brien, M.J., and Holland, T.D., 1990, Variation, Selection, and the Archaeological Record, in: Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory, Vol. 2 ( M.B. Schiffer, ed.), University of Arizona Press, Tucson, pp. 31–79.Google Scholar
  39. O’Brien, M.J., and Holland, T.D., 1992, The Role of Adaptation in Archaeological Explanation, American Antiquity 57 (1): 36–59CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Plog, S., 1990, Sociopolitical Implications of Stylistic Variation in the American Southwest, in: The Uses of Style in Archaeology ( M.W. Conkey and C.A. Hastorf. eds.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 61–70.Google Scholar
  41. Rindos, D., 1984, The Origins of Agriculture: An Evolutionary Perspective, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  42. Rindos, D., 1986, The Evolution of the Capacity for Culture: Sociobiology, Structuralism, and Cultural Selection, Current Anthropology 27: 315–332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Sackett, J.R., 1990, Style and Ethnicity in Archaeology: The Case for Isochrestism, in: The Uses of Style in Archaeology (M.W. Conkey and C.A. Hastorf, eds.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 32–43.Google Scholar
  44. Shennan, 5., 1989, Cultural Transmission and Cultural Change, in: What’s New? A Closer Look at the Process of Innovation (S.E. van der Leeuw and R. Torrence, eds.), Unwin Hyman Ltd, London, pp. 330–346.Google Scholar
  45. Suttles, W., 1983, Productivity and its Constraints: A Coast Salish Case, in: Indian Art Traditions of the Northwest Coast ( R.L. Carlson, ed.), Simon Fraser University Press, Burnaby, pp. 67–88.Google Scholar
  46. Suttles, W. (ed.), 1990, Handbook of North American Indians, Vol. 7, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  47. Weissner, P., 1985, Style or Isochrestic Variation? A Reply to Sackett, American Antiquity 50 (1): 160–166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Wolf, E.R., 1990, Distinguished Lecture: Facing Power—Old Insights, New Questions, American Anthropologist 92: 586–596.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Yoffee, N., 1991, Maya Elite Interaction: Through a Glass, Sideways, in: Classic Maya Political History: Hieroglyphic and Archaeological Evidence (T. P. Culbert, ed.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 285–310.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth M. Ames
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA

Personalised recommendations