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Frostbite, Hypothermia, and Resuscitation after Freezing

  • Audrey U. Smith
Part of the The International Cryogenics Monograph Series book series (INCMS)

Abstract

When we consider the effects of cold on intact mammals, including man, we are faced with a number of paradoxes. For instance, pieces of skin isolated from the surface of the body of man or laboratory mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, and guinea pigs) withstand cooling to and storage at low temperatures (−79 or −190°C) and will resume normal functions after thawing and grafting back onto the animal from which they were originally taken (1). Skin is, in fact, one of the easiest tissues to bank at low temperatures without killing its component cells (see Chapter 5). By contrast, if a similar area of skin of any of these mammals were frozen while still in its normal position on the body of the living animal, it would almost certainly be severely damaged and many or all of the component cells killed (1). It might later be sloughed off in the process known as frostbite even if the temperature at which it was frozen was no lower than −10°C. Arctic mammals such as the moose, wolf, polar bear, and the husky sledge dog are not apparently susceptible to frostbite or chilblains! They walk about and even sleep on the surface of the snow and ice at air temperatures down to −70°C without showing any signs of damage to the skin. Whales, sea-lions, porpoises, otters, water-rats, and various other mammals live in the sea, in rivers, or in bogs or marshes.

Keywords

Body Temperature Ground Squirrel Golden Hamster Artificial Respiration Cortisone Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • Audrey U. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Research Centre LaboratoriesNational Institute for Medical ResearchLondonEngland

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