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Preparation and Applications of Amorphous Silicon

  • P. G. LeComber
Part of the Physics of Solids and Liquids book series (PSLI)

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the preparation, properties, and possible applications of amorphous silicon (a-Si) prepared by the glow-discharge (gd) decomposition of silane. There were a number of important fundamental developments during the 1970s that established the considerable applied potential of this material and led to the present rapid growth in its use in commercial products. The first of these was the discovery,(1–4) as early as 1972, that a-Si prepared by the gd technique possesses a very low density of states in the mobility gap, probably the most important single factor in its applied potential. A direct result of this has been the development of the a-Si field-effect transistor (FET), discussed in Section 16.3, which could find applications in large-area addressable displays, in addressable image-sensing arrays, and in logic circuits.

Keywords

Threshold Voltage Amorphous Silicon Logic Circuit Deposition Unit Substitutional Doping 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. LeComber
    • 1
  1. 1.Carnegie Laboratory of PhysicsUniversity of DundeeDundeeScotland, UK

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