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Regenerator Performance Analysis

  • Robert A. Ackermann
Part of the The International Cryogenics Monograph Series book series (ICMS)

Abstract

Cryogenic refrigerators (cryocoolers) represent a natural application for regenerators. The periodic behavior, small size, and high thermal efficiency of a regenerator have contributed greatly to the development of efficient and reliable cryocoolers. It is doubtful that this development could have occurred with a conventional counterflow heat exchanger. The application of a regenerator in two generic types of cryocooler configurations is shown schematically in Fig. 3.1. The two schematics define the components common in all cryocoolers and the interconnection of these components. The cryocoolers each consist of a compression section, a regenerator, and an expansion section, but differ in the use of valves to separate the compression and expansion sections. Gifford–McMahon and Solvay cycle refrigerators are valved cryocoolers, whereas Stirling, pulse tube, and Vuilleumier (pronounced Viamay) cycle refrigerators are nonvalved—or constant-volume—cryocoolers.

Keywords

Heat Exchanger Regenerator Performance Cool Period Longitudinal Conduction Matrix Capacity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert A. Ackermann
    • 1
  1. 1.General Electric CompanySchenectadyUSA

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