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An Introduction to Critical Developmental Psychology

  • John M. Broughton
Part of the Path in Psychology book series (PATH)

Abstract

Developmental psychology is a manifold of diverse human activities. It is not just a scientific discipline combining theory with practice and research. It is also wholly a part of society, a social institution with a professional structure and a public presence. Not only does it influence social behavior, but it also represents a special form of continuous participation in the political process. It not only reflects ongoing social activities but joins concertedly in their formation, regulation, and reformation.

Keywords

Human Development Child Development Critical Approach Child Psychology Sage Publication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Broughton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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