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Effort Expenditure Following Failure

  • Carol E. Ford
  • Jack W. Brehm
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

There is a large body of research documenting the alternatively deleterious or beneficial effects of an experience with failure on subsequent performance. Performance feedback on an achievement-oriented task is, in fact, one of the most common independent variables to be found in clinical and social psychological research. Work on the effects of failure on subsequent performance has been used to examine a number of theoretical models; failure induction studies have been conducted by researchers interested, among other things, in test anxiety, depression, attributional processes, achievement motivation, stress, and frustration (Coyne, Metalsky, & Lavelle, 1980).

Keywords

Test Anxiety Causal Attribution Attributional Style Subsequent Performance Inescapable Shock 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol E. Ford
    • 1
  • Jack W. Brehm
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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