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Serial Changes in Acute Hypoxic and Hypercapnic Ventilatory Responses during High Altitiude Acclimatization

  • Atsuko Masuda
  • Shigeru Masuyama
  • Toshio Kobayashi
  • Yoshikazu Sakakibara
  • Masashi Hayano
  • Akira Kojima
  • Kiyoshi hasako
  • Takayuki Kuriyama
  • Yoshiyuki Honda

Abstract

Increased ventilation is important for persons going to high altitude and this is attributable to hypoxic stimulation of the peripheral chemoreceptors. However, the hypocapnia induced by hyperventilation and central hypoxic ventilatory depression substantailly attenuate the initial ventilatory response to hypoxia. Huang et al. (5) demonstrated that the combination of hypocapnia and sustained hypoxia might have blunted the ventilatory response on the first day after arrival on Pikes Peak (4300 m). Acute mountain sickness (AMS) occurs as acommon feature of ascent to high altitude usually within a few hours of ascent and lasting a few days. It has been recognized that ventilation is depressed in persons with symptoms of AMS (4). The reason for the hypoventilation in symptomatic persons is unknown. Moore et al. (8) suggest that hypoventilation in symptomatic compared to asymptomatic subjects is responsible for attenuated ventilatory response to acute hypoxia. In order to investigate the influence of altitude acclimatization on chemoresponsiveness, we consecutively examined hypoxic (HVR) and hypercapnic (HCVR) ventilatory responses in 7 lowlanders during sojourn in Lhasa (3700m), China.

Keywords

Ventilatory Response Acute Hypoxia Acute Mountain Sickness Serial Change Peripheral Chemoreceptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atsuko Masuda
    • 2
  • Shigeru Masuyama
    • 1
  • Toshio Kobayashi
    • 2
  • Yoshikazu Sakakibara
    • 2
  • Masashi Hayano
    • 2
  • Akira Kojima
    • 1
  • Kiyoshi hasako
    • 1
  • Takayuki Kuriyama
    • 1
  • Yoshiyuki Honda
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Department of Chest MedicineChiba UniversityChibaJapan
  2. 2.School of MedicineChiba UniversityChibaJapan

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