Altitude Acclimatization and Hypoxic Ventilatory Depression: Lowlanders and Highlanders

  • Shigeru Masuyama
  • Masashi Hayano
  • Akira Kojima
  • Kiyoshi Hasako
  • Takayuki Kuriyama
  • Atsuko Masuda
  • Toshio Kobayashi
  • Yoshikazu Sakakibara
  • Yoshiyuki Honda

Abstract

It has been well established that altitude acclimatization not only induces augmented ventilatory response to hypoxia3 but also deteriorative effect on ventilation1. The latter is well known as hypoxic ventilatory depression (HVD) for patients with chronic mountain sickness2, 4. As is presented in our other report in this proceedings8, in early acclimatizing period we should take such HVD into account for comprehending serial change of ventilatory response. HVD in humans has been observed and studied by many scientists. In addition to biphasic ventilatory response to sustained mild hypoxia5, paradoxical hyperpnea in response to oxygen administration in patients with chronic mountain sickness is also another important topics in current studies7, 10. If a subject developed hyperpnea by oxygen breathing, it can be considered to be relieved from hypoxic ventilatory depression.

Keywords

Depression Respiration Naloxone 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeru Masuyama
    • 2
  • Masashi Hayano
    • 2
  • Akira Kojima
    • 2
  • Kiyoshi Hasako
    • 2
  • Takayuki Kuriyama
    • 2
  • Atsuko Masuda
    • 1
  • Toshio Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Yoshikazu Sakakibara
    • 1
  • Yoshiyuki Honda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chest Medicine and PhysiologyChiba UniversityChibaJapan
  2. 2.School of MedicineChiba UniversityChibaJapan

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